Vive La France (Tier 2&3) 6 bottles: new size: new wines

Vive La France (1st & 2nd Tier Wines)

Geography:

Pack Quantity:

Price: ¥1,075

Chapoutier rustic wall and vines sunnyWe have been tinkering with this case over the years (as new wines became available to us) and it is now stronger than ever, with quite some variety.

For a low price introduction to French wines, this mix is hard to beat. Meander through Burgundy and the South of France in the care of some of France’s best known producers…some legends in their own right and of world renown. Drouhin and Chapoutier are world renowned legends. No contest.

It’s pretty amazingly valued for French wine generally, and most notably for the class of producer on show here.

Sure, you could always add more of the high quality value French wines we have searched long and hard and found….; such as a spicy Cotes du Ventoux or Cotes Du Rhone red, a spicy aromatic

Alsace white, a sweet Bordeaux dessert wine, a steely white Burgundy, an award winning, low-cost Bordeaux red, or a refreshing Southern Rosé; and why not……we have all those too in the France Section!lovely gigondas village

Ask us to drop one of those in as well or instead of the line-up here and we should be able to accommodate your requests. Bon Chance!

Please click on the wines listed below to extend/retract descriptions.

1x M. Chapoutier cotes du rhone Belleruche Rouge

It is a great coup for us to get access to this wine and a great privilege to now offer it for sale.

Garnet red. Red fruit aromas, mainly Morello cherries. Well-structured, with sustained tannins.

Perfect with pizza, pork and lamb dishes.

The Chapoutier family have been making wine in the Rhône Valley since 1808, but it is since 1990 when Michel Chapoutier came to the helm that the wines really began to speak of their origin.

Michel Chapoutier’s viticultural vision is highly impressive. His dedication to understanding each parcel of land and allowing it to make the best natural wine it can is breathtaking.

He has worked tirelessly to improve every practice in his company investing in his staff as well as in the winery and vineyard – much of his estate is now farmed biodynamically.

1x M. Chapoutier Crozes-Hermitage La Petite Ruche N Rhone

Michel Chapoutier is to The Southern Rhone, what Joseph Drouhin is in Burgundy: a class act negotiant. The vineyards of Crozes-Hermitage surround the great Hermitage Hill. Sometimes called a ‘down-sized Hermitage’ La Petite Ruche is all freshness and easy enjoyment from young vines. In fact, ‘Petite Ruche’ means ‘little beehive’; recalling the vineyard’s former use in bee keeping.

The grapes are hand harvested at peak maturity. Vinification takes place in cement vats with 2 daily treadings. Fermentation lasts from 10 to 12 days. Maturation takes place in vats. And the wine is bottled in the spring following harvest to preserve the natural fruit bouquet.

In this wine we have a deep purple red colour. The nose has lifted aromas of red fruits, blackcurrant and raspberry. The palate is fresh and round tasting with a finish of stewed fruits all served up with finesse.

a US site says:

100% Syrah. Deep reddish purple. Red fruits, blackcurrant, raspberry and black pepper. Fresh and round tasting with ripe fruits and a peppery finish.

Reviews and Scores speak for themselves…

Vintage 2006, 90/100 , Wine Spectator

Vintage 2007, 87/100 , Wine Spectator

Vintage 2007, 89/100 , Robert Parker’s Wine Advocate

The Chapoutier family have been making wine in the Rhône Valley since 1808, but it is since 1990 when Michel Chapoutier came to the helm that the wines really began to speak of their origin.

Michel Chapoutier’s viticultural vision is highly impressive. His dedication to understanding each parcel of land and allowing it to make the best natural wine it can is breathtaking.

He has worked tirelessly to improve every practice in his company investing in his staff as well as in the winery and vineyard – much of his estate is now farmed biodynamically.

1x Chateau Lamargue Cuvee Aegidienne South Rhone

With a predominance of ripe fruits, with hints of blackcurrant, vanilla and liquorice; this Cuvee also has some warming spice. The soft tannins and gentle toasted oak make for a structure that is dense and substantial, showing great potential for aging, probably for 4 to 5 years, if you are a little patient. Otherwise, ‘breathing’ the wine for a few hours will reap good dividends.

Food Matching: Can be tasted alone, for the pleasure of experiencing such a substantial wine, but I believe Cuvee Aegidiene is at it’s best when paired with a substantial and well prepared meal with meat in sauce or game. Equally fabulous with a Russian Beef Stroganoff or a warm and strongly flavoured rustic European Casserole.

Serving temperature: 20°C,Uncork 2 hours before serving for the absolute best results.

Located in France’s southern Rhône Valley, Château Lamargue (Lah-Marg) comprises 210 acres of vineyard in the up-and-coming Costières de Nîmes appellation. The estate boasts a showcase winery equipped with the most advanced winemaking technology as well as new French and American oak barriques. Investment to date stands at over $12 million dollars.

Lamargue is ambitious and wants to go places!

1x Chateau De Costis Bordeaux rouge New Wine Commended 2014

Coming soon…

1x Emile Durand Borgogne Chablis Burgundy

Chablis is one of the most famous white wines in the world.

It is made exclusively from Chardonnay grapes grown way far north where the resultant wines are full of mineral complexity and steely freshness.

Emile Durand makes a Premier Cru Chablis as well as this great value entry level Chablis.

From a restaurant menu near where I used to live in Bristol, UK, where it sells for £18.95 a bottle:

A wonderfully full wine with tropical fruit flavours. Clean, fresh with perfectly balanced acidity and with great length.

1x Leon Beyer Pinot Blanc Alsace

Elegant with a hint of spice, well-rounded yet delicate, combines freshness and softness, representing the happy medium in the range of Alsace wines. A well balanced wine.

Alsace wines don’t seem to sell very well here which is astounding, given their propensity to match well to Asian cuisine. Maybe they are just for those in the know.

Part of the problem may be that there’s no such thing as a cheap Alsace, like there is cheap Bordeaux or cheap Rhone or cheap Vin De Pays. The entry level is pretty much an exclusive leap into the Abyss of faith for many people that is just too hard to condone so they don’t try it.

If you ever get the chance, do leap into an Alsace wine. They are like nothing else on the planet.

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